Bound Volume Number

Volume II

Document Type

Honors Capstone Project

Date of Submission

Spring 5-2016

Capstone Advisor

Eleanor Maine

Capstone Major

Biology

Capstone College

Arts and Science

Audio/Visual Component

no

Keywords

signaling mechanism, Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans), GLP-1 signaling

Capstone Prize Winner

no

Won Capstone Funding

yes

Honors Categories

Sciences and Engineering

Subject Categories

Biology

Abstract

Notch signaling is a highly conserved signaling mechanism that is important for many developmental processes in animals. In the roundworm, Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans), GLP-1 signaling, a form of Notch signaling, is necessary for mitotic proliferation of the germline. glp-1(ts) mutants display a sterile phenotype at 20 °C. Previously, 14 extragenic suppressors were found that rescued the embryonic and germline temperature sensitive defects caused by improper functioning of GLP in a glp-1(ts) mutant. These mutations were mapped to six genes. These genes are referred to as suppressors of glp-1 or sog mutants. The current study serves to determine the identities of two of these genes, sog-4 and sog-6, at the molecular level using whole genome sequence analyses and RNA interference experiments. Whole genome sequence data support the possibility that sog-4 may correspond oac-49, while RNAi results suggest that sog-4 is not oac-49, a gene whose function is to regulate protein turnover. Both Whole genome sequence data and RNAi data support the possibility that sog-6 may correspond to F28D1.2. Understanding how sog-4 and sog-6 function to regulate the GLP-1/ Notch pathway can give meaningful insight as to how they can be used to regulate diseases that result from improper Notch signaling.

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

Included in

Biology Commons

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