ORCID

N/A

Funder(s)

N/A

Description/Abstract

This study found that despite the Post-9/11 Veterans Educational Assistance Act of 2008 expanding educational benefits for military veterans who have served since September 11, 2001, African American veterans are utilizing GI benefits less than other ethnic groups. In practice, institutions of higher education (IHE) must recognize that veterans have acquired life skills that can be assessed and worthy of academic credit, and employers should seriously consider African American veterans as potential employees, regardless of whether they have competed a college degree. In policy, the DoD and the VA might partner together to better ensure that African American service members are fully aware of their GI Bill benefits and know how to utilize the benefits before they discharge. Suggestions for future study include improving the reliability and validity of the findings through the employment of both objective and subjective data, as well as conducting qualitative interviews with veterans to further understand their experiences and needs.

Original Citation

Ottley, A. H. (2014). Empty promise: Black American veterans and the new GI Bill. New Directions for Adult and Continuing Education, 144, 79-88. https://doi.org/10.1002/ace.20116

Document Type

Brief

Disciplines

Adult and Continuing Education | Educational Sociology | Military and Veterans Studies | Public Affairs, Public Policy and Public Administration | Race and Ethnicity | Social and Behavioral Sciences | Sociology

Extent

2 pages

DCMI Type

Text

Keywords

G.I. Bill, Veterans, African American males, Higher education

Subject

African American veterans; Education (Higher)

Geographic Area

United States

Publisher

Institute for Veterans and Military Families at Syracuse University

Date

Spring 2-13-2015

Language

English

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.

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