Conference Editor

Jianshun Zhang; Edward Bogucz; Cliff Davidson; Elizabeth Krietmeyer

Keywords:

Controlled-study, IEQ, Living lab, Satisfaction, Workplace

Location

Syracuse, NY

Event Website

http://ibpc2018.org/

Start Date

26-9-2018 10:30 AM

End Date

26-9-2018 12:00 PM

Description

Living labs offer a powerful, new way to measure human-building interactions. In addition to having the advantages of a traditional controlled laboratory setting, living labs facilitate the study of how combinations of environmental factors directly affect human health and satisfaction in a real-world setting. The aim of this experimental study was to characterize the relationship between individual-level exposure to environmental conditions and reported satisfaction with environmental quality in a simulated open-office workspace created in a living lab. Eight office workers were exposed to six different week-long combinations of light (natural and electric), sound, and thermal conditions over 18 weeks in a living lab. We assigned exposure to temperature, relative humidity, and light, specifically illuminance, to each participant using measurements from the environmental sensor in closest proximity to the participant. Sound measurements were collected by only one device, so all participants were assigned the same sound exposure. Participants also completed daily questionnaires in which they rated their level of satisfaction with the overall quality of the workplace and with specific environmental parameters in the simulated workspace. Using ordinal response mixed effects models, we found that temperature, noise, and light — individually and in combination — were significant predictors of self-reported occupant satisfaction. Our results contribute to a better understanding of the relative importance of environmental parameters to employee satisfaction in a real-world context, which may be useful for guiding and optimizing building design and management decisions to best serve its occupants.

Comments

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.14305/ibpc.2018.hf-4.03

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 4.0 License.

COinS
 
Sep 26th, 10:30 AM Sep 26th, 12:00 PM

Environmental Conditions and Occupant Satisfaction in the Workplace: A Controlled Study in a Living Lab

Syracuse, NY

Living labs offer a powerful, new way to measure human-building interactions. In addition to having the advantages of a traditional controlled laboratory setting, living labs facilitate the study of how combinations of environmental factors directly affect human health and satisfaction in a real-world setting. The aim of this experimental study was to characterize the relationship between individual-level exposure to environmental conditions and reported satisfaction with environmental quality in a simulated open-office workspace created in a living lab. Eight office workers were exposed to six different week-long combinations of light (natural and electric), sound, and thermal conditions over 18 weeks in a living lab. We assigned exposure to temperature, relative humidity, and light, specifically illuminance, to each participant using measurements from the environmental sensor in closest proximity to the participant. Sound measurements were collected by only one device, so all participants were assigned the same sound exposure. Participants also completed daily questionnaires in which they rated their level of satisfaction with the overall quality of the workplace and with specific environmental parameters in the simulated workspace. Using ordinal response mixed effects models, we found that temperature, noise, and light — individually and in combination — were significant predictors of self-reported occupant satisfaction. Our results contribute to a better understanding of the relative importance of environmental parameters to employee satisfaction in a real-world context, which may be useful for guiding and optimizing building design and management decisions to best serve its occupants.

https://surface.syr.edu/ibpc/2018/HF4/3

 

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