Funder(s)

Robert Wood Johnson Foundation

Description/Abstract

Child care is expensive and difficult to find, especially for infants and toddlers. Compared to their higher-income peers, children from lower-income families are less likely to attend out-of-home early childhood care – which tend to be more expensive but provides more stability and is higher quality than home-based care. This contributes to disparities in school readiness and later life outcomes. This brief summarizes findings from a recently published paper examining administrative data from the Commonwealth of Virginia. Findings suggest that children are least likely to receive subsides when they are infants and toddlers despite early childhood care being the most important to development in the first three years of life.

Document Type

Research Brief

Keywords

Child Care Subsidy, Racial Equity, Child Health

Disciplines

Public Administration | Public Affairs, Public Policy and Public Administration | Public Economics | Public Policy | Social Policy

Date

10-12-2021

Language

English

Acknowledgements

This research was funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. Special thanks for editorial assistance from Nicole Replogle.

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.

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