Conference Editor

Jianshun Zhang; Edward Bogucz; Cliff Davidson; Elizabeth Krietmeyer

Location

Syracuse, NY

Event Website

http://ibpc2018.org/

Start Date

25-9-2018 3:15 PM

End Date

25-9-2018 5:00 PM

Description

Hygroscopic materials, including earth- and plant-based materials used in tropical vernacular architecture, often sorb significant moisture from the atmosphere during humid nighttime hours; evaporation the following day then provides a pronounced cooling effect, particularly in semi-arid regions. While such intrinsic evaporative cooling is also active in wet-tropical climates, it cannot maintain indoor comfort, and vernacular structures are highly open to facilitate air movement. Recently, new hygroscopic materials have been developed from coconut agricultural wastes that show great potential for intrinsic evaporative cooling and indoor humidity control in contemporary tropical buildings. As expected, however, they must be combined with additional cooling strategies to maintain thermal comfort. This investigation explores the integration of intrinsic evaporative cooling with natural ventilation and shading to determine the extent to which indoor thermal comfort, as evaluated by the ASHRAE 55 adaptive thermal comfort standard, may be maintained in the representative wet-tropical climate of Ghana, West Africa.

Comments

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.14305/ibpc.2018.ps22

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 4.0 License.

COinS
 
Sep 25th, 3:15 PM Sep 25th, 5:00 PM

Intrinsic Evaporative Cooling with Natural Ventilation and Shading for Adaptive Thermal Comfort in Tropical Buildings

Syracuse, NY

Hygroscopic materials, including earth- and plant-based materials used in tropical vernacular architecture, often sorb significant moisture from the atmosphere during humid nighttime hours; evaporation the following day then provides a pronounced cooling effect, particularly in semi-arid regions. While such intrinsic evaporative cooling is also active in wet-tropical climates, it cannot maintain indoor comfort, and vernacular structures are highly open to facilitate air movement. Recently, new hygroscopic materials have been developed from coconut agricultural wastes that show great potential for intrinsic evaporative cooling and indoor humidity control in contemporary tropical buildings. As expected, however, they must be combined with additional cooling strategies to maintain thermal comfort. This investigation explores the integration of intrinsic evaporative cooling with natural ventilation and shading to determine the extent to which indoor thermal comfort, as evaluated by the ASHRAE 55 adaptive thermal comfort standard, may be maintained in the representative wet-tropical climate of Ghana, West Africa.

https://surface.syr.edu/ibpc/2018/posters/22

 

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