Conference Editor

Jianshun Zhang; Edward Bogucz; Cliff Davidson; Elizabeth Krietmeyer

Location

Syracuse, NY

Event Website

http://ibpc2018.org/

Start Date

25-9-2018 1:30 PM

End Date

25-9-2018 3:00 PM

Description

Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are considered a major group of indoor air contaminants with several proven adverse health effects. Ultraviolet photocatalytic oxidation process (UVPCO) is a promising technology for the removal of VOC contaminants in indoor air environments. In addition, adequate efficiency of PCO has been proven in laboratory conditions. However, when PCO is scaled up and applied in real conditions, there are some limitations that need to be addressed. Several factors are involved in the efficiency of the PCO process such as humidity, flow rate (residence time), inlet of contaminant concentration, light source, etc. To the best of our knowledge, most of the research conducted in this area has been performed in a bench-scale reactor with long residence times of several minutes and at high VOCs concentrations (hundreds ppm level), which are far from being real indoor conditions. The main objective of this research is to study the scaling effect on isobutanol removal efficiency under the conditions relevant to real indoor applications. For this purpose, full-scale (0.6 m × 0.6 m), pilot-scale (four parallel ducts, 0.3 m × 0.3 m each) and bench-scale (9 cm × 7 cm) test set-ups were used to study the VOCs removal efficiencies via PCO in the gas phase. First, three experimental set-ups for testing TiO2 photocatalyst are described. Then, the isobutanol removal efficiency is evaluated in the condition, which is close to the real application, considering the low-level contaminant concentration and high flow rate. The relative humidity in this study is kept in the comfort zone (RH ~ 50±5 %). The performance of UVC-PCO of the three scales is compared and discussed. For isobutanol with 0.003 mg/m3 inlet contaminant concentration, around 24%, 56%, and 68% removal efficiencies were achieved in the full, pilot, and bench-scale systems, respectively.

Comments

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.14305/ibpc.2018.ie-5.02

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 4.0 License.

COinS
 
Sep 25th, 1:30 PM Sep 25th, 3:00 PM

Assessing the Performance of Photocatalytic Oxidation of Volatile Organic Compounds in Three Different Scaled Set-ups

Syracuse, NY

Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are considered a major group of indoor air contaminants with several proven adverse health effects. Ultraviolet photocatalytic oxidation process (UVPCO) is a promising technology for the removal of VOC contaminants in indoor air environments. In addition, adequate efficiency of PCO has been proven in laboratory conditions. However, when PCO is scaled up and applied in real conditions, there are some limitations that need to be addressed. Several factors are involved in the efficiency of the PCO process such as humidity, flow rate (residence time), inlet of contaminant concentration, light source, etc. To the best of our knowledge, most of the research conducted in this area has been performed in a bench-scale reactor with long residence times of several minutes and at high VOCs concentrations (hundreds ppm level), which are far from being real indoor conditions. The main objective of this research is to study the scaling effect on isobutanol removal efficiency under the conditions relevant to real indoor applications. For this purpose, full-scale (0.6 m × 0.6 m), pilot-scale (four parallel ducts, 0.3 m × 0.3 m each) and bench-scale (9 cm × 7 cm) test set-ups were used to study the VOCs removal efficiencies via PCO in the gas phase. First, three experimental set-ups for testing TiO2 photocatalyst are described. Then, the isobutanol removal efficiency is evaluated in the condition, which is close to the real application, considering the low-level contaminant concentration and high flow rate. The relative humidity in this study is kept in the comfort zone (RH ~ 50±5 %). The performance of UVC-PCO of the three scales is compared and discussed. For isobutanol with 0.003 mg/m3 inlet contaminant concentration, around 24%, 56%, and 68% removal efficiencies were achieved in the full, pilot, and bench-scale systems, respectively.

https://surface.syr.edu/ibpc/2018/IE5/2

 

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