Conference Editor

Jianshun Zhang; Edward Bogucz; Cliff Davidson; Elizabeth Krietmeyer

Location

Syracuse, NY

Event Website

http://ibpc2018.org/

Start Date

25-9-2018 10:30 AM

End Date

25-9-2018 12:00 PM

Description

The high solar heat gains in highly glazed buildings are a major thermal discomfort factor leading to higher energy consumption for space cooling. Higher window to wall ratios (WWR) also entail large temperature fluctuations due to heat loss and temperature extremes in buildings. Passive latent heat thermal energy storage (LHTES) is a potential solution to regulate the indoor thermal environment in buildings through mitigating the indoor surface temperatures. In this study, the effectiveness of phase change materials (PCMs) in the context of a highly glazed apartment unit with 80% WWR is investigated for internal wall and ceiling applications. To provide thermal energy storage across the year, a composite PCM system with two melting temperatures is proposed, comprised of two PCM products, one with a melting temperature of 21.7 oC and the other with a melting temperature of 25 oC. To test the performance of this PCM, experimental tests were performed using test cells placed under climate conditions of Toronto to monitor changes in the phase change cycles of the PCMs and their impact on indoor air and surface temperatures. The results indicate improved thermal performance of the test cell containing the PCM system compared to a baseline cell in lowering peak indoor air and surface temperatures up to 6 oC. A relation was observed between the peak solar gain periods and the PCM behavior during the melting and solidification processes. This paper shows the potential of using PCMs as retrofit applications in highly glazed buildings by targeting specifically annual LHTES with two melting temperatures in one zone in a continental climate.

Comments

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.14305/ibpc.2018.be-7.02

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 4.0 License.

COinS
 
Sep 25th, 10:30 AM Sep 25th, 12:00 PM

Experimental investigation of latent heat thermal energy storage for highly glazed apartments in a continental climate

Syracuse, NY

The high solar heat gains in highly glazed buildings are a major thermal discomfort factor leading to higher energy consumption for space cooling. Higher window to wall ratios (WWR) also entail large temperature fluctuations due to heat loss and temperature extremes in buildings. Passive latent heat thermal energy storage (LHTES) is a potential solution to regulate the indoor thermal environment in buildings through mitigating the indoor surface temperatures. In this study, the effectiveness of phase change materials (PCMs) in the context of a highly glazed apartment unit with 80% WWR is investigated for internal wall and ceiling applications. To provide thermal energy storage across the year, a composite PCM system with two melting temperatures is proposed, comprised of two PCM products, one with a melting temperature of 21.7 oC and the other with a melting temperature of 25 oC. To test the performance of this PCM, experimental tests were performed using test cells placed under climate conditions of Toronto to monitor changes in the phase change cycles of the PCMs and their impact on indoor air and surface temperatures. The results indicate improved thermal performance of the test cell containing the PCM system compared to a baseline cell in lowering peak indoor air and surface temperatures up to 6 oC. A relation was observed between the peak solar gain periods and the PCM behavior during the melting and solidification processes. This paper shows the potential of using PCMs as retrofit applications in highly glazed buildings by targeting specifically annual LHTES with two melting temperatures in one zone in a continental climate.

https://surface.syr.edu/ibpc/2018/BE7/8

 

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