Conference Editor

Jianshun Zhang; Edward Bogucz; Cliff Davidson; Elizabeth Krietmeyer

Keywords:

Internal insulation; capillary active material; measurements; moisture; heat

Location

Syracuse, NY

Event Website

http://ibpc2018.org/

Start Date

24-9-2018 3:30 PM

End Date

24-9-2018 5:00 PM

Description

This paper presents a pilot project for renovation of a large residential area; focus is on energy consumption and risk of mold growth. The renovation included internal insulation of walls with capillary active insulation material, balanced mechanical ventilation with heat recovery and insulation of floor towards basement. These types of measures are not completely new and have been used in other buildings as well, however the measures may be either risky regarding mold growth or the effect is uncertain with the specific external wall composition. A pilot project including six apartments was performed to test the measures in these specific buildings. Furthermore, six reference apartments were monitored simultaneously. For two years, energy use for heating was measured as well as temperature and relative humidity in the internal insulation, indoors and outside. The insulation was dismantled in two apartments after two years, to test for mold growth at the original wall surface. In extreme cases, the relative humidity in the walls behind the insulation system was up to 90 % RH shortly after installation, and mold growth models predicted growth of mold. However, the relative humidity decreased, typically to 70 % RH in the second winter. The inspection and measurements after the removal of the insulation material did not show signs of mold growth. Apparently, the used insulation material can be used in this specific case without risk of mold growth. Energy savings for heating was measured and calculated to around 25 %. However, the electricity use for ventilation was almost equal to savings from heat recovery.

Comments

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.14305/ibpc.2018.be-6.06

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 4.0 License.

COinS
 
Sep 24th, 3:30 PM Sep 24th, 5:00 PM

Renovation with Internal Insulation and Heat Recovery in Real Life– Energy Savings and Risk of Mold Growth

Syracuse, NY

This paper presents a pilot project for renovation of a large residential area; focus is on energy consumption and risk of mold growth. The renovation included internal insulation of walls with capillary active insulation material, balanced mechanical ventilation with heat recovery and insulation of floor towards basement. These types of measures are not completely new and have been used in other buildings as well, however the measures may be either risky regarding mold growth or the effect is uncertain with the specific external wall composition. A pilot project including six apartments was performed to test the measures in these specific buildings. Furthermore, six reference apartments were monitored simultaneously. For two years, energy use for heating was measured as well as temperature and relative humidity in the internal insulation, indoors and outside. The insulation was dismantled in two apartments after two years, to test for mold growth at the original wall surface. In extreme cases, the relative humidity in the walls behind the insulation system was up to 90 % RH shortly after installation, and mold growth models predicted growth of mold. However, the relative humidity decreased, typically to 70 % RH in the second winter. The inspection and measurements after the removal of the insulation material did not show signs of mold growth. Apparently, the used insulation material can be used in this specific case without risk of mold growth. Energy savings for heating was measured and calculated to around 25 %. However, the electricity use for ventilation was almost equal to savings from heat recovery.

https://surface.syr.edu/ibpc/2018/BE6/12

 

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