Conference Editor

Jianshun Zhang; Edward Bogucz; Cliff Davidson; Elizabeth Krietmeyer

Keywords:

Roof design; eaves; robustness; precipitation, water ingress

Location

Syracuse, NY

Event Website

http://ibpc2018.org/

Start Date

24-9-2018 3:30 PM

End Date

24-9-2018 5:00 PM

Description

Ventilated pitched wooden roofs with eaves (roof overhangs) is a common building practice in the Scandinavian countries. The eaves are protecting the façade from rain, wind driven rain (WDR) and snow, and it covers the roof ventilation aperture. The eaves should be designed so that the least possible amounts of rainwater and snow enters the ventilation aperture between the roof cladding- and underlayer roofing. At the same time, adequate ventilation of the roof must be ensured to promote proper drying-out capabilities of the roof and to avoid problems of snow melt and ice formation at eaves and gutters during winter season. Small or almost nonexisting eaves is a trend in modern architecture. It is a common perception that such solutions are more vulnerable to moisture damages due to possible increase of water penetration into the roof aperture. The aim of the study is to experimentally investigate the moisture robustness of the described risk area and to find answers to how the design of eaves influence the amount of rain that is driven on to the underlayer roofing under the aperture in ventilated roofs. It was found that the amount of collected water in the different test series to a large extent are given by the water droplet size as well as the wind velocity inside the air cavity. The results from this study simulates an example of a rain event with heavy rain intensity and strong winds (storm). The test represents an example of a storm event with a given droplet size distribution. The results indicate that an increased pressure drop decreases the water ingress. Comparative tests showed that installation of a wire mesh largely decreases the measured water collection and the dynamic pressures inside the air cavity.

Comments

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.14305/ibpc.2018.be-5.05

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 4.0 License.

COinS
 
Sep 24th, 3:30 PM Sep 24th, 5:00 PM

Moisture robustness of eaves solutions for ventilated roofs – experimental studies

Syracuse, NY

Ventilated pitched wooden roofs with eaves (roof overhangs) is a common building practice in the Scandinavian countries. The eaves are protecting the façade from rain, wind driven rain (WDR) and snow, and it covers the roof ventilation aperture. The eaves should be designed so that the least possible amounts of rainwater and snow enters the ventilation aperture between the roof cladding- and underlayer roofing. At the same time, adequate ventilation of the roof must be ensured to promote proper drying-out capabilities of the roof and to avoid problems of snow melt and ice formation at eaves and gutters during winter season. Small or almost nonexisting eaves is a trend in modern architecture. It is a common perception that such solutions are more vulnerable to moisture damages due to possible increase of water penetration into the roof aperture. The aim of the study is to experimentally investigate the moisture robustness of the described risk area and to find answers to how the design of eaves influence the amount of rain that is driven on to the underlayer roofing under the aperture in ventilated roofs. It was found that the amount of collected water in the different test series to a large extent are given by the water droplet size as well as the wind velocity inside the air cavity. The results from this study simulates an example of a rain event with heavy rain intensity and strong winds (storm). The test represents an example of a storm event with a given droplet size distribution. The results indicate that an increased pressure drop decreases the water ingress. Comparative tests showed that installation of a wire mesh largely decreases the measured water collection and the dynamic pressures inside the air cavity.

https://surface.syr.edu/ibpc/2018/BE5/11

 

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