Document Type

Honors Capstone Project

Date of Submission

Spring 5-1-2010

Capstone Advisor

Dr. M. Gail Hamner

Honors Reader

Dr. Ed F. Mooney

Capstone Major

Philosophy

Capstone College

Arts and Science

Audio/Visual Component

no

Capstone Prize Winner

no

Won Capstone Funding

no

Honors Categories

Humanities

Subject Categories

Other Philosophy | Philosophy | Religion

Abstract

How are we oriented toward things outside our bodies? More specifically, how are our bodies tethered by the hooks of ideology, lurched forward in the inertia of consumer capitalism, or led tacitly by state and social apparatuses? This orienting of our bodies toward prescribed action relies on the conscious recognition these (abstract) objects exterior to our selves—we must face them, to complete the orienting process. But what happens when we turn away? And what kind of objects could so capture our attention, as to divert the normative gaze from the ushers of hegemonic power? Art that exists outside of commodity production—art that is created outside the realm of surplus value production—has this special, distracting power. The properties of finite temporality, and spatial fixity in such non-commodity art frustrate the process of commodification. But perhaps more importantly, such art may lure us to frustrate this process (and others) ourselves. Given that the grounding of our orientation toward ideology may be two-fold, inwardly and exteriorly grounded, the act of resistance becomes a process that relies on a new recognition of what directs us, and how we react. Special art sites and spaces are one element of that dual grounding that demands not only where we are, but where we should be. In this way, these sites become the grounding of resistance.

How are we oriented toward things outside our bodies? More specifically, how are our bodies tethered by the hooks of ideology, lurched forward in the inertia of consumer capitalism, or led tacitly by state and social apparatuses? This orienting of our bodies toward prescribed action relies on the conscious recognition these (abstract) objects exterior to our selves—we must face them, to complete the orienting process. But what happens when we turn away? And what kind of objects could so capture our attention, as to divert the normative gaze from the ushers of hegemonic power? Art that exists outside of commodity production—art that is created outside the realm of surplus value production—has this special, distracting power. The properties of finite temporality, and spatial fixity in such non-commodity art frustrate the process of commodification. But perhaps more importantly, such art may lure us to frustrate this process (and others) ourselves. Given that the grounding of our orientation toward ideology may be two-fold, inwardly and exteriorly grounded, the act of resistance becomes a process that relies on a new recognition of what directs us, and how we react. Special art sites and spaces are one element of that dual grounding that demands not only where we are, but where we should be. In this way, these sites become the grounding of resistance.

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 License.

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