Document Type

Honors Capstone Project

Date of Submission

Spring 5-1-2013

Capstone Advisor

Tanya Eckert, Ph.D.

Honors Reader

Benita Blachman, Ph.D.

Capstone Major

Psychology

Capstone College

Arts and Science

Audio/Visual Component

no

Capstone Prize Winner

no

Won Capstone Funding

no

Honors Categories

Social Sciences

Subject Categories

Applied Behavior Analysis | Child Psychology | Developmental Psychology | Psychology

Abstract

Reading is an essential skill; however, the majority of elementary-aged students are not performing at grade level. This is problematic because poor reading is a significant risk factor for dropping out of high school. A number of demographic factors have been associated with students’ reading performance, including sex, socioeconomic status, and race/ethnicity. Educators use a number of measures to assess students’ reading performance. One screening measure, curriculum-based measurement in reading (CBM-R), is a time- and cost-efficient tool to assess elementary-aged students’ oral reading fluency. However, a number of research studies have shown that students’ performance on CBM-R assessments may be influenced by contextual factors, including who conducts the assessment, where the assessment is conducted, and whether or not the assessment is timed. The impact of students’ pre-assessment disposition on CBM-R scores has yet to be sufficiently examined. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether a combined model, which included demographic factors (i.e. sex, socioeconomic status) and a contextual factor, (i.e. student disposition) significantly predicted variance in students’ oral reading fluency growth. A standard multiple regression was conducted and results demonstrated that the combined model of sex, socioeconomic status, and disposition significantly predicted variance in students’ oral reading fluency growth. F (4, 35) = 3.35, p = .02. Sex on its own was found to be a significant predictor of variance in students’ oral reading fluency growth, but disposition was not. There was a positive correlation between sex and oral reading fluency growth (r = .44, p = .004) and a positive correlation between disposition and oral reading fluency growth (r = .38, p = .010). The link between disposition and oral reading fluency growth should not be ignored. Educators should consider this link prior to conducting and interpreting reading assessments.

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 License.

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