Density: Through Thick and Thin, Los Angeles

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density, syracuse architecture, symposia, greg goldin, sam lubell, stuart rosenthal, lemir teron, jamie winder, francisco sanin






The Syracuse Architecture undergraduate program presents the third installment of “Density: Through Thick and Thin,” a 3-part series of discussions on re-surging issues about urban density in the 21st century.

An interdisciplinary symposium to explore density in Los Angeles, and its urban future in face of rising challenges and identity politics.

What kind of city should Los Angeles become?

The question strikes at the heart of challenging and polarizing issues Angelenos struggle with as their city faces the effects of rapid growth and rapid urban transformation. Perhaps no issue defines the challenges faced by Los Angles, and indeed cities across North America, more than housing: Should there be more or less public housing? More or less market rate development? What should be the mix of public and private housing? And should new housing, whether public or market rate, be more or less dense?

As we face pressures of global population explosion, measurable and alarming ecological stress and related urbanization, the symposia offer an arena to discuss the current and near future status of the fundamental quality of built environments. Join us as we focus on discourse occurring in LA and a larger discussion about the various modes of urban density and their relation to environmental, economic, social, cultural and political quality.

Part Three: Los Angeles


Greg Goldin

Architectural critic and writer

Sam Lubell

Architectural critic and writer

Stuart Rosenthal

Urban economist, professor, Maxwell Advisory Board Professor of Economics

Lemir Teron Environmental justice and policy; Assistant Professor, SUNY-ESF

Jamie Winder

Urban geographer; O’Hanley Faculty Scholar, Professor, Maxwell School

Francisco Sanin, Moderator

Professor, Syracuse Architecture

Sponsored by the Syracuse Architecture undergraduate program, Associate Professor Lawrence Davis, Chair; Curated by Associate Professor Elizabeth Kamell and Assistant Professor Tarek Rakha


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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.