Title

An Analysis of Factors That Are Assumed To Influence Acculturation and Assimilation of Tribal Minorities in Northern Thailand

Date of Award

1972

Degree Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Department

Anthropology

Advisor(s)

David E. Sopher

Keywords

Nation states, Independence, Tribal groups

Subject Categories

Anthropology

Abstract

Soon after World War II, and partly as a consequence of forces released by that conflict, most of the nations of mainland Southeast Asia attained independence from Western imperial control. The one exception was Thailand, which had managed, by means of shrewd diplomacy, to retain its freedom throughout the entire period of Western colonial influence in the region. While most of these nations had a long history of political organization and had held administrative authority over often vaguely defined territorial domains, the structure of the nation states that were created following independence introduced certain concepts of government that were to have serious implications for the various minority tribal groups living within the boundaries of the newly created states.

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