Title

Urban Background To The Interstate Highway Program: The Planning And Politics Of Highways In Syracuse, 1944-1960

Date of Award

1978

Degree Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Department

History

Advisor(s)

David H. Bennett

Keywords

History, New York State roads, Interstate Highway Program, urban transportation

Subject Categories

Transportation

Abstract

Introduction:

In 1956 Congress approved the Interstate Highway Act, committing the nation to a massive road building program. The federal government was directed to provide 90 percent of the funds necessary to complete the National System of Interstate and Defense Highways, a 42,500 mile network of expressways which was to connect the country's major centers of population.

.. this study will accomplish a number of historical objectives. By the mid-1960s massive Interstate highways were a fact of life in almost every major city in the nation. It is my intention to explore how and why this came about. Such an analysis must also touch upon the consequences if this urban commitment to highway construction, particularly measured against the expectations with which such polices were based upon. Finally, my broader goal is to contribute to an understanding of how large federal programs, in this instance the Interstate Highway System, affected the fabric of urban life in modern America.

Access

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