Title

Observations on Lemon Cells

Document Type

Article

Date

4-2001

Embargo Period

2-6-2013

Keywords

high school, introductory chemistry, chemical education research, misconceptions, discrepant events, electrochemistry

Disciplines

Chemistry

Description/Abstract

The lemon cell, consisting of pieces of two different metals stuck into a lemon or other fruit, is pictured in many general chemistry textbooks without being discussed. We describe simple experiments, suitable for the general chemistry laboratory, which elucidate how this kind of cell works. They show that (i) the cell is not two metal-metal ion half cells, and (ii) the cell reaction involves dissolution of the more active metal and generation of hydrogen on the less active metal. Why the cell works this way is explained, and the cell's historical importance is discussed.

Additional Information

Copyright 2001 Journal of Chemical Education. This article may be downloaded for personal use only. Any other use requires prior permission of the author and Journal of Chemical Education.

The article may be found at http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/ed078p516

Source

local input

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.