Authors/Contributors

Nicola Kyverniti

Document Type

Thesis Prep

Publication Date

12-2015

Degree

B. ARCH

Keywords

cyprus, division, conflict, unifying separated communities, urban intervention, divide

Language

English

Disciplines

Architectural History and Criticism | Architecture | Urban, Community and Regional Planning

Description/Abstract

Creating urban interventions in the city at different scales and sites strategically chosen to attract the city population would have the potential to expose the state of the urban fabric. Nodes designed to alter the perspective of the occupant. Exposure created through the language of architecture. Revealling dividing elements emphasizes the need for a true symbol of dialogue and freedom of discussion between the separated communities. At a global scale, conflict is not something that can truly be resolved or diminished. The notion of conflict occurs in certain locations at different periods, following the evolution of political, social, economic, and cultural context. With each city of conflict encountering different scenarios and set of issues, it essential to understand what factors are fundamentally shared by conflicted sites. At a city scale, it is necesary to acknowledge that the conflict exists. To heal a wound, it must first be expose. The situation shown so that it can be understood thus open to the potential of change. With the pending decision of Nicosia’s future fast approaching, the city’s urban state must be exposed to the occupants of the city in order to evolve. This is not a solution. Not a quick-fix of a conflict’s effects. It is an exposure. A knowledge of a wounded city. This is not a proposal of the fundamental solution. This is a discussion to expose the decayed residue of a conflict. To create a potential towards rebuilding after the scar of the war. After all, conflict is permanently temporary.

Source

School of Architecture 2015

Creative Commons License


This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

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