A study of possible connections between teachers' professional development and the performance evaluation process

George Luis Hext Contreras, Syracuse University

Description/Abstract

The study's purpose was to identify teachers' perceptions on professional development (PD) in curriculum and pedagogy, knowledge of teacher evaluation processes, active participation (AP) of teachers in the evaluation process, and evaluation effectiveness (EE) and the relationships to each other. A Likert-like scaled survey was completed by teachers from 30 school buildings selected from a sample of New York State schools and analyzed using factor analysis, Pearson's "r," correlations, and t-tests. Teachers and principals were interviewed in 4 of the participating schools that were selected to represent different patterns of responses. The interviews were used to qualify findings in the survey data and to gain insight into the teachers' reported perceptions of AP and EE.

Conclusions are: (1) Teachers who report that they are active participants in their evaluations also appear to report their evaluations to be effective. (2) Teachers who receive evaluation training report that they are more active participants in their evaluations and report that their evaluations are effective. (3) A relationship exits between teachers' reports of their PD in AP evaluation models and (a) their reports of AP and (b) of EE. (4) A relationship exists between teachers' reports of classroom observation/consultation with other teachers and (a) their reports of AP and (b) of EE. (5) Teachers' reports and they receive training when curriculum changes are adopted appear to be related (a) to their reports of AP and (b) of EE. (6) Teachers' perceptions of their PD in instruction or student assessment strategies appear to be related (a) to their reports of AP and (b) of EE. (7) Involved teachers' reports of their PD through attendance at professional conferences or reading of professional journals appear to be related to their reports of AP. (8) A relationship exits between teachers who report they they have a voice in curriculum policies and (a) their reports of AP and (b) of EE. (9) Teachers' reports of their PD through attendance at professional conferences or reading professional journals appears to be related to their perceptions of EE.