Conference Editor

Jianshun Zhang; Edward Bogucz; Cliff Davidson; Elizabeth Krietmeyer

Location

Syracuse, NY

Event Website

http://ibpc2018.org/

Start Date

25-9-2018 3:15 PM

End Date

25-9-2018 5:00 PM

Description

Understanding the dynamic response of a building is essential in the design of sustainable energy-efficient buildings. Using data from over 10,000 smart thermostats, this study identifies patterns in the dynamic thermal response of residential buildings in Canada and the United States (US). The data set consists of one year of measurements recorded at 5-minute intervals for the indoor and outdoor air temperature as well as HVAC equipment run times. This study focuses on identifying effective values of time constants for the houses by applying the following procedure. First, periods complying with the following basic criteria are identified: a) the house is under free-floating conditions (i.e. when the HVAC system is switched off) for more than three hours and b) the outdoor temperature remains approximately constant (the outdoor temperature change is smaller than or equal to 2°C). Second, for each identified period, time constant values are determined by tracking the temperature responses of the house. These values are determined assuming the characteristic exponential decay of a first-order resistance-capacitance (RC) thermal model. Finally, a statistical analysis is applied to identify a typical range of effective time constant values according to month. Consequently, calculations show significant differences between estimated values for the summer and winter months, which may be attributed to occupant behaviour. In winter, the majority of time constants range from 15 to 55 hours. In summer, most of time constants vary between less than 1 hour and 18 hours due to occupants opening windows. In addition, the dependence of the time constant on the age of the home is investigated.

Comments

If you are experiencing accessibility issues with this item, please contact the Accessibility and Inclusion Librarian through lib-accessibility@syr.edu with your name, SU NetID, the SURFACE link, title of record, and author & and reason for request.

DOI

https://doi.org/10.14305/ibpc.2018.ps17

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 4.0 License.

COinS
 
Sep 25th, 3:15 PM Sep 25th, 5:00 PM

Estimating time constants for over 10,000 residential buildings in North America: towards a statistical characterization of thermal dynamics

Syracuse, NY

Understanding the dynamic response of a building is essential in the design of sustainable energy-efficient buildings. Using data from over 10,000 smart thermostats, this study identifies patterns in the dynamic thermal response of residential buildings in Canada and the United States (US). The data set consists of one year of measurements recorded at 5-minute intervals for the indoor and outdoor air temperature as well as HVAC equipment run times. This study focuses on identifying effective values of time constants for the houses by applying the following procedure. First, periods complying with the following basic criteria are identified: a) the house is under free-floating conditions (i.e. when the HVAC system is switched off) for more than three hours and b) the outdoor temperature remains approximately constant (the outdoor temperature change is smaller than or equal to 2°C). Second, for each identified period, time constant values are determined by tracking the temperature responses of the house. These values are determined assuming the characteristic exponential decay of a first-order resistance-capacitance (RC) thermal model. Finally, a statistical analysis is applied to identify a typical range of effective time constant values according to month. Consequently, calculations show significant differences between estimated values for the summer and winter months, which may be attributed to occupant behaviour. In winter, the majority of time constants range from 15 to 55 hours. In summer, most of time constants vary between less than 1 hour and 18 hours due to occupants opening windows. In addition, the dependence of the time constant on the age of the home is investigated.

https://surface.syr.edu/ibpc/2018/posters/17

 

To view the content in your browser, please download Adobe Reader or, alternately,
you may Download the file to your hard drive.

NOTE: The latest versions of Adobe Reader do not support viewing PDF files within Firefox on Mac OS and if you are using a modern (Intel) Mac, there is no official plugin for viewing PDF files within the browser window.