Conference Editor

Jianshun Zhang; Edward Bogucz; Cliff Davidson; Elizabeth Krietmeyer

Location

Syracuse, NY

Event Website

http://ibpc2018.org/

Start Date

24-9-2018 10:30 AM

End Date

24-9-2018 12:00 PM

Description

There is growing evidence that heat waves are becoming more frequent under increased greenhouse forcing, associated with higher daytime temperatures and reduced night-time cooling, which might exceed the limits of thermoregulation of the human body and affect dramatically human health. Especially urban areas are affected, since these regions in addition experience an urban heat island (UHI) effect characterized by higher air temperatures compared to the surrounding rural environment. A necessary breakthrough is a shift away from a fragmented approach towards an integrated multiscale urban climate analysis. This type of research is a rather new domain of research and might be based on an all-physics understanding and modeling of the urban climate ranging from the scales of material and buildings, to the scales of a group of several buildings, street canyons, neighbourhoods, cities and urban regions, referred to as multiscale building physics. To adequately cover global and local urban heat island effect, regional and mesoscale climate analyses have to be downscaled to sub-kilometer resolution and linked with urban climate models at neighborhood and street canyon scales. Such a multiscale urban climate model allows to analyze the influence of urban and building parameters on thermal comfort and the building cooling demand. The importance of accounting for the local urban climate when quantifying the space cooling demands of buildings in an urban environment is demonstrated. The heat-moisture transport model for building materials allows the design of new building materials, which can help in the mitigation of local heat islands. With respect to evaporative cooling materials, we need to optimize their water retention and evaporative cooling by tailoring their pore structure. The understanding and information obtained from pore-scale investigations enables to understand macro-scale transport processes, and enabling us to explore the potential of new evaporative cooling materials at local urban scale.

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COinS
 
Sep 24th, 10:30 AM Sep 24th, 12:00 PM

Multiphysics Modeling of Materials, Assemblies, Buildings and Cities

Syracuse, NY

There is growing evidence that heat waves are becoming more frequent under increased greenhouse forcing, associated with higher daytime temperatures and reduced night-time cooling, which might exceed the limits of thermoregulation of the human body and affect dramatically human health. Especially urban areas are affected, since these regions in addition experience an urban heat island (UHI) effect characterized by higher air temperatures compared to the surrounding rural environment. A necessary breakthrough is a shift away from a fragmented approach towards an integrated multiscale urban climate analysis. This type of research is a rather new domain of research and might be based on an all-physics understanding and modeling of the urban climate ranging from the scales of material and buildings, to the scales of a group of several buildings, street canyons, neighbourhoods, cities and urban regions, referred to as multiscale building physics. To adequately cover global and local urban heat island effect, regional and mesoscale climate analyses have to be downscaled to sub-kilometer resolution and linked with urban climate models at neighborhood and street canyon scales. Such a multiscale urban climate model allows to analyze the influence of urban and building parameters on thermal comfort and the building cooling demand. The importance of accounting for the local urban climate when quantifying the space cooling demands of buildings in an urban environment is demonstrated. The heat-moisture transport model for building materials allows the design of new building materials, which can help in the mitigation of local heat islands. With respect to evaporative cooling materials, we need to optimize their water retention and evaporative cooling by tailoring their pore structure. The understanding and information obtained from pore-scale investigations enables to understand macro-scale transport processes, and enabling us to explore the potential of new evaporative cooling materials at local urban scale.

https://surface.syr.edu/ibpc/2018/keynotes/5

 

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