Conference Editor

Jianshun Zhang; Edward Bogucz; Cliff Davidson; Elizabeth Krietmeyer

Keywords:

Life Cycle Analysis, Natural Hazards, Resilience, Sustainability, Embodied Energy

Location

Syracuse, NY

Event Website

http://ibpc2018.org/

Start Date

25-9-2018 10:30 AM

End Date

25-9-2018 12:00 PM

Description

In order to curtail energy use by the building sector, consideration of how a "sustainable" building is constructed is paramount, in many respects, to how efficiently it operates over its lifetime. A typical building must be in use for decades before the energy expended in its daily operations surpasses the energy embodied within its initial construction, as a result of the materials used. More vitally: every building has specific vulnerabilities, particularly to hazards (e.g., earthquakes, wind, flooding) whose effects on sustainability are not explicitly considered alongside other aspects of sustainability in the design process – despite the significant environmental impact of damage and repairs after a disaster. Unfortunately, the joint consideration of resilience and sustainability in design is far from trivial, requiring various interdisciplinary perspectives involved in the delivery of building projects. These perspectives each contribute the models and data necessary for integrated evaluation, leading to the notorious challenges of BIM and data interoperability. In response, this paper presents a new end-to-end workflow for life-cycle assessment (LCA) of buildings that captures the dependencies between multi-hazard resilience and sustainability, across multiple dimensions of environmental impact. An illustrative example reveals how consideration of hazards during design and material selection influence embodied energy, ultimately revealing design choices that best achieve joint resiliency and sustainability.

Comments

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.14305/ibpc.2018.ms-4.02

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 4.0 License.

COinS
 
Sep 25th, 10:30 AM Sep 25th, 12:00 PM

A New Normative Workflow for Integrated Life-Cycle Assessment

Syracuse, NY

In order to curtail energy use by the building sector, consideration of how a "sustainable" building is constructed is paramount, in many respects, to how efficiently it operates over its lifetime. A typical building must be in use for decades before the energy expended in its daily operations surpasses the energy embodied within its initial construction, as a result of the materials used. More vitally: every building has specific vulnerabilities, particularly to hazards (e.g., earthquakes, wind, flooding) whose effects on sustainability are not explicitly considered alongside other aspects of sustainability in the design process – despite the significant environmental impact of damage and repairs after a disaster. Unfortunately, the joint consideration of resilience and sustainability in design is far from trivial, requiring various interdisciplinary perspectives involved in the delivery of building projects. These perspectives each contribute the models and data necessary for integrated evaluation, leading to the notorious challenges of BIM and data interoperability. In response, this paper presents a new end-to-end workflow for life-cycle assessment (LCA) of buildings that captures the dependencies between multi-hazard resilience and sustainability, across multiple dimensions of environmental impact. An illustrative example reveals how consideration of hazards during design and material selection influence embodied energy, ultimately revealing design choices that best achieve joint resiliency and sustainability.

https://surface.syr.edu/ibpc/2018/MS4/2

 

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