Conference Editor

Jianshun Zhang; Edward Bogucz; Cliff Davidson; Elizabeth Krietmeyer

Keywords:

Pareto Optimality, Daylighting Analysis, Glare, Energy Efficiency

Location

Syracuse, NY

Event Website

http://ibpc2018.org/

Start Date

24-9-2018 10:30 AM

End Date

24-9-2018 12:00 PM

Description

Architectural designs are increasingly driven by both sustainability and health, which requires evaluating the tradeoff between visual comfort and energy consumption. Lack of daylight leads to poor visual comfort and health issues but reduces heat gains, while excessive daylight may lead to over-illumination, glare, and high heat gains. Identifying the tradeoff between multiple criteria is an intricate process that requires skill and experience, especially when dealing with complex phenomena such as visual comfort. In order to facilitate this process, this paper provides two contributions: (1) the description of a new single-valued visual comfort measure, and (2) the application of the Pareto optimality analysis method. Pareto optimality analysis consists of comparing different design options in terms of the tradeoff between multiple criteria, which is a method that is rarely used in architectural design albeit its many advantages. For the Pareto optimality analysis, single-valued performance metrics are required. The energy performance metrics such as annual heating and cooling loads are single-valued quantities that, nowadays, can be calculated and measured easily. Daylight performance, however, is a complex multi-dimensional phenomenon. While previously developed daylight and glare performance metrics have their merits, they are not readily applicable to Pareto analysis. In this work, a new light metric called Effective Glare and Light Measure (EGLM) is developed to address the current limitations. The EGLM metric is defined as a weighted sum of several normalized performance metrics to end up with a single-valued measure of visual comfort. Two software programs, DIVA-for-Rhino and EnergyPlusTM, are used to calculate the time-dependent visual performance data and energy consumption, respectively. A script is then used to post-process the data. Several case studies are presented to illustrate the method with various building orientations, window-to-wall ratios, overhang depths, and glass visibility transmittance.

Comments

If you are experiencing accessibility issues with this item, please contact the Accessibility and Inclusion Librarian through lib-accessibility@syr.edu with your name, SU NetID, the SURFACE link, title of record, and author & and reason for request.

DOI

https://doi.org/10.14305/ibpc.2018.ms-1.05

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 4.0 License.

COinS
 
Sep 24th, 10:30 AM Sep 24th, 12:00 PM

Pareto Optimality Analysis for Evaluating the Tradeoff between Visual Comfort and Energy Efficiency

Syracuse, NY

Architectural designs are increasingly driven by both sustainability and health, which requires evaluating the tradeoff between visual comfort and energy consumption. Lack of daylight leads to poor visual comfort and health issues but reduces heat gains, while excessive daylight may lead to over-illumination, glare, and high heat gains. Identifying the tradeoff between multiple criteria is an intricate process that requires skill and experience, especially when dealing with complex phenomena such as visual comfort. In order to facilitate this process, this paper provides two contributions: (1) the description of a new single-valued visual comfort measure, and (2) the application of the Pareto optimality analysis method. Pareto optimality analysis consists of comparing different design options in terms of the tradeoff between multiple criteria, which is a method that is rarely used in architectural design albeit its many advantages. For the Pareto optimality analysis, single-valued performance metrics are required. The energy performance metrics such as annual heating and cooling loads are single-valued quantities that, nowadays, can be calculated and measured easily. Daylight performance, however, is a complex multi-dimensional phenomenon. While previously developed daylight and glare performance metrics have their merits, they are not readily applicable to Pareto analysis. In this work, a new light metric called Effective Glare and Light Measure (EGLM) is developed to address the current limitations. The EGLM metric is defined as a weighted sum of several normalized performance metrics to end up with a single-valued measure of visual comfort. Two software programs, DIVA-for-Rhino and EnergyPlusTM, are used to calculate the time-dependent visual performance data and energy consumption, respectively. A script is then used to post-process the data. Several case studies are presented to illustrate the method with various building orientations, window-to-wall ratios, overhang depths, and glass visibility transmittance.

https://surface.syr.edu/ibpc/2018/MS1/5

 

To view the content in your browser, please download Adobe Reader or, alternately,
you may Download the file to your hard drive.

NOTE: The latest versions of Adobe Reader do not support viewing PDF files within Firefox on Mac OS and if you are using a modern (Intel) Mac, there is no official plugin for viewing PDF files within the browser window.