Conference Editor

Jianshun Zhang; Edward Bogucz; Cliff Davidson; Elizabeth Krietmeyer

Keywords:

Building energy modelling, multi-fidelity, modified bin, degree day, dynamic simulation

Location

Syracuse, NY

Event Website

http://ibpc2018.org/

Start Date

24-9-2018 10:30 AM

End Date

24-9-2018 12:00 PM

Description

Building energy modelling has become an integral part of building design due to energy consumption concerns in sustainable buildings. As such, energy modelling methods have evolved to the point of including higher-order physics, complex interconnected components and sub-systems. Despite advances in computer capacity, the cost of generating and running complex energy simulations makes it impractical to rely exclusively on such higher fidelity energy modelling for exploring a large set of design alternatives. This challenge of exploring a large set of alternatives efficiently might be overcome by using surrogate models to generalize across the large design space from an evaluation of a sparse subset of design alternatives by higher fidelity energy modelling or by using a set of multi-fidelity models in combination to efficiently evaluate the design space. Given there exists a variety of building energy modelling methods for energy estimation, multi-fidelity modelling could be a promising approach for broad exploration of design spaces to identify sustainable building designs. Hence, this study investigates energy estimates from three energy modelling methods (modified bin, degree day, EnergyPlus) over a range of design variables and climatic regions. The goal is to better understand how their outputs compare to each other and whether they might be suitable for a multi-fidelity modelling approach. The results show that modified bin and degree day methods yield energy use estimates of similar magnitude to each other but are typically higher than results from EnergyPlus. The differences in the results were traced, as expected, to the heating and cooling end-uses, and specifically to the heat gain and heat loss through opaque (i.e., walls, floors, roofs) and window surfaces. The observed trends show the potential for these methods to be used for multi-fidelity modelling, thereby allowing building designers to broadly consider and compare more design alternatives earlier in the design process.

Comments

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.14305/ibpc.2018.ms-1.03

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 4.0 License.

COinS
 
Sep 24th, 10:30 AM Sep 24th, 12:00 PM

Investigation of Energy Modelling Methods of Multiple Fidelities: A Case Study

Syracuse, NY

Building energy modelling has become an integral part of building design due to energy consumption concerns in sustainable buildings. As such, energy modelling methods have evolved to the point of including higher-order physics, complex interconnected components and sub-systems. Despite advances in computer capacity, the cost of generating and running complex energy simulations makes it impractical to rely exclusively on such higher fidelity energy modelling for exploring a large set of design alternatives. This challenge of exploring a large set of alternatives efficiently might be overcome by using surrogate models to generalize across the large design space from an evaluation of a sparse subset of design alternatives by higher fidelity energy modelling or by using a set of multi-fidelity models in combination to efficiently evaluate the design space. Given there exists a variety of building energy modelling methods for energy estimation, multi-fidelity modelling could be a promising approach for broad exploration of design spaces to identify sustainable building designs. Hence, this study investigates energy estimates from three energy modelling methods (modified bin, degree day, EnergyPlus) over a range of design variables and climatic regions. The goal is to better understand how their outputs compare to each other and whether they might be suitable for a multi-fidelity modelling approach. The results show that modified bin and degree day methods yield energy use estimates of similar magnitude to each other but are typically higher than results from EnergyPlus. The differences in the results were traced, as expected, to the heating and cooling end-uses, and specifically to the heat gain and heat loss through opaque (i.e., walls, floors, roofs) and window surfaces. The observed trends show the potential for these methods to be used for multi-fidelity modelling, thereby allowing building designers to broadly consider and compare more design alternatives earlier in the design process.

https://surface.syr.edu/ibpc/2018/MS1/3

 

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