Conference Editor

Jianshun Zhang; Edward Bogucz; Cliff Davidson; Elizabeth Krietmeyer

Location

Syracuse, NY

Event Website

http://ibpc2018.org/

Start Date

25-9-2018 10:30 AM

End Date

25-9-2018 12:00 PM

Description

The need to meet requirements, both in terms of ventilation and thermal comfort in modern buildings, has led to the development of different concepts for ventilation, among which the so-called Diffuse Ceiling Ventilation (DCV). This system makes use of the space between the ceiling slabs and the suspended ceiling as a plenum for fresh air, while the suspended ceiling itself becomes an air diffuser element. If compared to traditional solutions, this allows a higher amount of ventilation air to be injected in the room at lower speed, and a more even distribution of the fresh air within the room. Furthermore, it allows an easy integration with sound-absorbing perforated ceiling panels, since their typical design makes them particularly fit to be used as air diffusers. This paper builds upon a previous work by the authors where CFD simulations were used to optimise the dimension and the distribution of the perforation pattern in the panels to achieve an even air speed distribution. In this work, the performance of the perforated ceiling is investigated in a more comprehensive way, evaluating the thermal comfort in the room when varying the outdoor temperature. This solution is in fact meant to work in combination with natural or hybrid ventilation strategies, where the fresh air flow is supplied from the façade. Numerical simulations were performed on a typical office room, considering both the winter and the summer season, for different inlet air temperatures. This solution demonstrated a positive impact on the indoor conditions and on the thermal comfort inside the room in most of the cases but the most extreme ones. The thermal stratification in the room demonstrated to remain within a satisfactory level.

Comments

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.14305/ibpc.2018.ie-4.04

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 4.0 License.

COinS
 
Sep 25th, 10:30 AM Sep 25th, 12:00 PM

Numerical investigation of a diffuse ventilation ceiling system for buildings with natural and hybrid ventilation

Syracuse, NY

The need to meet requirements, both in terms of ventilation and thermal comfort in modern buildings, has led to the development of different concepts for ventilation, among which the so-called Diffuse Ceiling Ventilation (DCV). This system makes use of the space between the ceiling slabs and the suspended ceiling as a plenum for fresh air, while the suspended ceiling itself becomes an air diffuser element. If compared to traditional solutions, this allows a higher amount of ventilation air to be injected in the room at lower speed, and a more even distribution of the fresh air within the room. Furthermore, it allows an easy integration with sound-absorbing perforated ceiling panels, since their typical design makes them particularly fit to be used as air diffusers. This paper builds upon a previous work by the authors where CFD simulations were used to optimise the dimension and the distribution of the perforation pattern in the panels to achieve an even air speed distribution. In this work, the performance of the perforated ceiling is investigated in a more comprehensive way, evaluating the thermal comfort in the room when varying the outdoor temperature. This solution is in fact meant to work in combination with natural or hybrid ventilation strategies, where the fresh air flow is supplied from the façade. Numerical simulations were performed on a typical office room, considering both the winter and the summer season, for different inlet air temperatures. This solution demonstrated a positive impact on the indoor conditions and on the thermal comfort inside the room in most of the cases but the most extreme ones. The thermal stratification in the room demonstrated to remain within a satisfactory level.

https://surface.syr.edu/ibpc/2018/IE4/4

 

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