Conference Editor

Jianshun Zhang; Edward Bogucz; Cliff Davidson; Elizabeth Krietmeyer

Keywords:

Boundary Object, Energy Efficiency, Exploratory Study, Tangible User Interface.

Location

Syracuse, NY

Event Website

http://ibpc2018.org/

Start Date

25-9-2018 1:30 PM

End Date

25-9-2018 3:00 PM

Description

We report the results of an empirical study on an enabled application’s ability to act as a boundary object and build understanding of energy efficiency solutions. Combining digital and tangible technology with radio-frequency identification (RFID) tags, we have created an interactive, digitally enabled device and application called HOUSE (Home User and Stakeholder Environment). The HOUSE tool and application have been designed and developed to support interaction and collaboration in the exploration of domestic energy efficiency solutions. HOUSE allows users to associate information with physical representations, and to explore this information through manipulation of enabled objects. The interactive application consists of a 24:1 scale representation of an archetypal UK home and thirteen model energy efficiency interventions integrated with a digital application. Each energy efficiency intervention is enabled with RFID tagging and detection, to allow participants to physically interact with the HOUSE application. The app detects when a model energy efficiency intervention is placed in the model HOUSE. Participants then receive real-time feedback on their energy efficiency selection and the implication of their retrofit decisions. We explore the role of HOUSE acting as a boundary object, in facilitating the transfer of knowledge across domains. The application was evaluated in academic non-expert and industry (expert) stakeholder workshops. Results showed there is a self-reported increase in collaboration and consensus amongst non-experts (Group A) using the HOUSE interactive application. There is also a self-reported difference in the decision-making process surrounding retrofit selection for experts (Group D) using the HOUSE interactive application. Moreover, there is evidence from experts to conclude that the HOUSE can assist in transmitting findings in meaningful ways to non-experts in the field.

Comments

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.14305/ibpc.2018.hf-3.02

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 4.0 License.

COinS
 
Sep 25th, 1:30 PM Sep 25th, 3:00 PM

HOUSE: Building energy efficiency understanding through an enabled boundary object

Syracuse, NY

We report the results of an empirical study on an enabled application’s ability to act as a boundary object and build understanding of energy efficiency solutions. Combining digital and tangible technology with radio-frequency identification (RFID) tags, we have created an interactive, digitally enabled device and application called HOUSE (Home User and Stakeholder Environment). The HOUSE tool and application have been designed and developed to support interaction and collaboration in the exploration of domestic energy efficiency solutions. HOUSE allows users to associate information with physical representations, and to explore this information through manipulation of enabled objects. The interactive application consists of a 24:1 scale representation of an archetypal UK home and thirteen model energy efficiency interventions integrated with a digital application. Each energy efficiency intervention is enabled with RFID tagging and detection, to allow participants to physically interact with the HOUSE application. The app detects when a model energy efficiency intervention is placed in the model HOUSE. Participants then receive real-time feedback on their energy efficiency selection and the implication of their retrofit decisions. We explore the role of HOUSE acting as a boundary object, in facilitating the transfer of knowledge across domains. The application was evaluated in academic non-expert and industry (expert) stakeholder workshops. Results showed there is a self-reported increase in collaboration and consensus amongst non-experts (Group A) using the HOUSE interactive application. There is also a self-reported difference in the decision-making process surrounding retrofit selection for experts (Group D) using the HOUSE interactive application. Moreover, there is evidence from experts to conclude that the HOUSE can assist in transmitting findings in meaningful ways to non-experts in the field.

https://surface.syr.edu/ibpc/2018/HF3/2

 

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