Conference Editor

Jianshun Zhang; Edward Bogucz; Cliff Davidson; Elizabeth Krietmeyer

Keywords:

Occupant behavior; Dynamic thermal-energy simulation; Continuous monitoring; Behavior modeling; Scientific Contextual EEG

Location

Syracuse, NY

Event Website

http://ibpc2018.org/

Start Date

25-9-2018 10:30 AM

End Date

25-9-2018 12:00 PM

Description

Given the massive scientific progress on passive and active solutions to reach near-zeroenergy targets, the necessity to consider occupants’ behavior as a key variable affecting field energy performance of buildings has become a crucial issue to face. In this panorama, a variety of deterministic and stochastic models, also supported by experimental investigations have been developed in the last decade. This paper builds upon previous contributions to analyze the real occupancy of an office building populated by peers’ offices monitored for 2 years by means of microclimate and energy-need field stations. After demonstrating that the peers do not behave the same and do not control in equivalent ways indoors microclimate parameters (e.g. air temperature, desk illuminance, etc.), internationally acknowledged models and field-collected data are compared through dynamic simulation. The estimation of final energy need of different considered scenarios is calculated and the relative difference is highlighted as a possible indicator about the role of building occupancy profiles in affecting energy need prediction. Additionally, EEG experimental test are used to assess the correlation of workers’ subjective emotions with external thermal stimuli. Results of final energy need estimation showed to vary by about 20% by only selecting the occupancy simulation scheme, and non-consistent prediction trends are found out while investigating lighting and electric appliances needs. Accordingly, as concerns the human psychological response to the variation of thermal conditions, negligible emotional reactions are found among the different tested workers when suddenly altering comfort conditions indoors.

Comments

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.14305/ibpc.2018.hf-2.02

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 4.0 License.

COinS
 
Sep 25th, 10:30 AM Sep 25th, 12:00 PM

Field occupants’ behavior monitoring integrated to prediction models: impact on building energy performance

Syracuse, NY

Given the massive scientific progress on passive and active solutions to reach near-zeroenergy targets, the necessity to consider occupants’ behavior as a key variable affecting field energy performance of buildings has become a crucial issue to face. In this panorama, a variety of deterministic and stochastic models, also supported by experimental investigations have been developed in the last decade. This paper builds upon previous contributions to analyze the real occupancy of an office building populated by peers’ offices monitored for 2 years by means of microclimate and energy-need field stations. After demonstrating that the peers do not behave the same and do not control in equivalent ways indoors microclimate parameters (e.g. air temperature, desk illuminance, etc.), internationally acknowledged models and field-collected data are compared through dynamic simulation. The estimation of final energy need of different considered scenarios is calculated and the relative difference is highlighted as a possible indicator about the role of building occupancy profiles in affecting energy need prediction. Additionally, EEG experimental test are used to assess the correlation of workers’ subjective emotions with external thermal stimuli. Results of final energy need estimation showed to vary by about 20% by only selecting the occupancy simulation scheme, and non-consistent prediction trends are found out while investigating lighting and electric appliances needs. Accordingly, as concerns the human psychological response to the variation of thermal conditions, negligible emotional reactions are found among the different tested workers when suddenly altering comfort conditions indoors.

https://surface.syr.edu/ibpc/2018/HF2/2

 

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