Event Title

Using rain and vegetation to improve thermal comfort in a hot street canyon with fully-integrated urban climate modeling

Conference Editor

Jianshun Zhang; Edward Bogucz; Cliff Davidson; Elizabeth Krietmeyer

Location

Syracuse, NY

Event Website

http://ibpc2018.org/

Start Date

25-9-2018 12:00 PM

End Date

25-9-2018 10:30 AM

Description

Building materials that are commonly used in urban areas generally have higher sensible heat storage and radiation entrapment, while having lower moisture storage and evapotranspiration, in comparison to the materials found in rural areas. These differences play a significant role in the occurrence of the urban heat island (UHI) effect, which has adverse impacts on thermal comfort, energy use and public health. Coupled numerical simulations of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) with the heat and mass transfer (HAM) in porous urban materials are performed to estimate the evaporative-cooling potential of different pavements in a street canyon. The local thermal comfort following a rain event on different pavements is compared with the one in presence of a grass-covered surface. The results show that the grasscovered ground provides better pedestrian thermal comfort, followed by porous material with large liquid permeability.

Comments

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Sep 25th, 12:00 PM Sep 25th, 10:30 AM

Using rain and vegetation to improve thermal comfort in a hot street canyon with fully-integrated urban climate modeling

Syracuse, NY

Building materials that are commonly used in urban areas generally have higher sensible heat storage and radiation entrapment, while having lower moisture storage and evapotranspiration, in comparison to the materials found in rural areas. These differences play a significant role in the occurrence of the urban heat island (UHI) effect, which has adverse impacts on thermal comfort, energy use and public health. Coupled numerical simulations of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) with the heat and mass transfer (HAM) in porous urban materials are performed to estimate the evaporative-cooling potential of different pavements in a street canyon. The local thermal comfort following a rain event on different pavements is compared with the one in presence of a grass-covered surface. The results show that the grasscovered ground provides better pedestrian thermal comfort, followed by porous material with large liquid permeability.

https://surface.syr.edu/ibpc/2018/GB2/6