Presenter Information

Martha Bohm, University at Buffalo

Conference Editor

Jianshun Zhang; Edward Bogucz; Cliff Davidson; Elizabeth Krietmeyer

Keywords:

Natural ventilation, passive, thermal performance, residential, cold climate

Location

Syracuse, NY

Event Website

http://ibpc2018.org/

Start Date

24-9-2018 3:30 PM

End Date

24-9-2018 5:00 PM

Description

Natural ventilation provides opportunities to reduce residential cooling load in summer, but increasing the operability of a façade potentially increases infiltration, which is already a source of significant winter heat load. Solving both of these simultaneously is challenging. The test building for this study was a prototype house containing a novel ventilator detail which allows for porosity for summer ventilation and a tight, insulated seal in winter. We aimed to determine whether the prototype had low enough infiltration and thermal bridging to be worthy of further laboratory testing and subsequent deployment in more buildings. The test home was blower door tested, following the Resnet standard to determine ACH50. While the house was depressurized, diagnostic photographs were taken with a smoke wand at each ventilator to qualitatively document air exchange. The ventilator plan and section details were modeled in THERM v7.6 to look for potential thermal bridging. These tests were conducted in February 2018 on the GRoW Home, a prototype house built for the 2015 Solar Decathlon at the University at Buffalo. The home contains thirteen instances of the ventilation detail in question. ACH50 was found to be 1.16, photographs showed observable infiltration at only five of the thirteen apertures, and only when the operable interior door was open. The thermal flux magnitude analysis did not evidence major thermal bridging. Thus this ventilation approach shows promise for naturally ventilated small buildings in cold climates. Further laboratory study is warranted to characterize and further improve the construction.

Comments

If you are experiencing accessibility issues with this item, please contact the Accessibility and Inclusion Librarian through lib-accessibility@syr.edu with your name, SU NetID, the SURFACE link, title of record, and author & and reason for request.

DOI

https://doi.org/10.14305/ibpc.2018.be-5.06

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 4.0 License.

COinS
 
Sep 24th, 3:30 PM Sep 24th, 5:00 PM

Thermal Performance of Novel Natural Ventilation Apertures in a High- Performance Single-Family House

Syracuse, NY

Natural ventilation provides opportunities to reduce residential cooling load in summer, but increasing the operability of a façade potentially increases infiltration, which is already a source of significant winter heat load. Solving both of these simultaneously is challenging. The test building for this study was a prototype house containing a novel ventilator detail which allows for porosity for summer ventilation and a tight, insulated seal in winter. We aimed to determine whether the prototype had low enough infiltration and thermal bridging to be worthy of further laboratory testing and subsequent deployment in more buildings. The test home was blower door tested, following the Resnet standard to determine ACH50. While the house was depressurized, diagnostic photographs were taken with a smoke wand at each ventilator to qualitatively document air exchange. The ventilator plan and section details were modeled in THERM v7.6 to look for potential thermal bridging. These tests were conducted in February 2018 on the GRoW Home, a prototype house built for the 2015 Solar Decathlon at the University at Buffalo. The home contains thirteen instances of the ventilation detail in question. ACH50 was found to be 1.16, photographs showed observable infiltration at only five of the thirteen apertures, and only when the operable interior door was open. The thermal flux magnitude analysis did not evidence major thermal bridging. Thus this ventilation approach shows promise for naturally ventilated small buildings in cold climates. Further laboratory study is warranted to characterize and further improve the construction.

https://surface.syr.edu/ibpc/2018/BE5/12

 

To view the content in your browser, please download Adobe Reader or, alternately,
you may Download the file to your hard drive.

NOTE: The latest versions of Adobe Reader do not support viewing PDF files within Firefox on Mac OS and if you are using a modern (Intel) Mac, there is no official plugin for viewing PDF files within the browser window.