Conference Editor

Jianshun Zhang; Edward Bogucz; Cliff Davidson; Elizabeth Krietemeyer

Location

Syracuse, NY

Event Website

http://ibpc2018.org/

Start Date

24-9-2018 1:30 PM

End Date

24-9-2018 3:00 PM

Description

The main objective of this paper is by measurements to investigate whether increased thermal insulation thickness reduces the temperature in ventilated attics. With lower heat flux through the ceiling in the winter, the theory is that the temperature in the attic decreases and consequently the relative humidity increases which may cause mold growth. While some simulations support this theory, others do not. To test the theory in practice, measurements were performed in 29 dwellings, mainly older single family houses with ventilated attics and insulation thicknesses varying between 150 and 600 mm (6“ and 23“). The temperature was measured for more than one year in the attic, the living space below and outdoors. All measured attics were ventilated as recommended in guidelines; i.e. with openings at the top and the bottom. The measurements in the attics showed high dependency on the outdoor temperature, while indoor temperature and the thickness of insulation were not significant. Consequently, the thermal insulation thickness alone cannot explain possible increasing mold problems. However, extra insulation in attics may obstruct the ventilation openings and therefore, reduce the ventilation rate. Measurements of ventilation rates in non-problematic and moldy attics should therefore be the next step.

Comments

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.14305/ibpc.2018.be-3.03

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 4.0 License.

COinS
 
Sep 24th, 1:30 PM Sep 24th, 3:00 PM

Measurements of Temperature Dependency on Thermal Insulation Thickness in Ventilated Attics

Syracuse, NY

The main objective of this paper is by measurements to investigate whether increased thermal insulation thickness reduces the temperature in ventilated attics. With lower heat flux through the ceiling in the winter, the theory is that the temperature in the attic decreases and consequently the relative humidity increases which may cause mold growth. While some simulations support this theory, others do not. To test the theory in practice, measurements were performed in 29 dwellings, mainly older single family houses with ventilated attics and insulation thicknesses varying between 150 and 600 mm (6“ and 23“). The temperature was measured for more than one year in the attic, the living space below and outdoors. All measured attics were ventilated as recommended in guidelines; i.e. with openings at the top and the bottom. The measurements in the attics showed high dependency on the outdoor temperature, while indoor temperature and the thickness of insulation were not significant. Consequently, the thermal insulation thickness alone cannot explain possible increasing mold problems. However, extra insulation in attics may obstruct the ventilation openings and therefore, reduce the ventilation rate. Measurements of ventilation rates in non-problematic and moldy attics should therefore be the next step.

https://surface.syr.edu/ibpc/2018/BE3/3

 

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