Conference Editor

Jianshun Zhang; Edward Bogucz; Cliff Davidson; Elizabeth Krietemeyer

Location

Syracuse, NY

Event Website

http://ibpc2018.org/

Start Date

24-9-2018 10:30 AM

End Date

24-9-2018 12:00 PM

Description

The harsh Norwegian climate requires buildings designed according to high standards. The airtightness of the building envelope is crucial to attain an energy efficient building and to avoid moisture problems. A considerable part of building defects registered in the SINTEF Building defects archive are related to leakages through door sills especially in combination with balconies. The aim of the study has been to examine the rain tightness of the joint below door sills. A laboratory investigation using a driving rain cabined according to EN 1027 has been conducted to provide answers to the matter. In total 14 different test were conducted. Two different sills were included, both a traditional "high" sill and a "lower" handicap-sill. Two different underlays for the sill were included in the investigation. In addition, 3 different heights of the joint-sealing below the sill were chosen (0, 5 and 10 mm). All the tests except two were performed with silicon as joint sealant material. It was found that the workmanship of the joint-sealing was challenging due to the geometry of the detail. Even if the silicon sealant was carefully applied, voids between the sealant and door sill were found when inspecting closely. When improving the faults, the test showed that the joints was tight. 11 of the 14 tests showed no water leakages at 600 Pa pressure difference. However, leakages were observed at lower pressure differences for the sills with no silicon sealing and for the configurations where there were faults in the silicon sealing. The laboratory study revealed that the joint below the door sill is vulnerable to small mistakes in the workmanship. Given a carefully application and control of the silicon sealing it is possible to achieve a high water tightness performance. However, improvements to the sealing detail is needed to further increase the robustness of the detail.

Comments

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.14305/ibpc.2018.be-2.05

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 4.0 License.

COinS
 
Sep 24th, 10:30 AM Sep 24th, 12:00 PM

Rain-tightness of door sill sealing

Syracuse, NY

The harsh Norwegian climate requires buildings designed according to high standards. The airtightness of the building envelope is crucial to attain an energy efficient building and to avoid moisture problems. A considerable part of building defects registered in the SINTEF Building defects archive are related to leakages through door sills especially in combination with balconies. The aim of the study has been to examine the rain tightness of the joint below door sills. A laboratory investigation using a driving rain cabined according to EN 1027 has been conducted to provide answers to the matter. In total 14 different test were conducted. Two different sills were included, both a traditional "high" sill and a "lower" handicap-sill. Two different underlays for the sill were included in the investigation. In addition, 3 different heights of the joint-sealing below the sill were chosen (0, 5 and 10 mm). All the tests except two were performed with silicon as joint sealant material. It was found that the workmanship of the joint-sealing was challenging due to the geometry of the detail. Even if the silicon sealant was carefully applied, voids between the sealant and door sill were found when inspecting closely. When improving the faults, the test showed that the joints was tight. 11 of the 14 tests showed no water leakages at 600 Pa pressure difference. However, leakages were observed at lower pressure differences for the sills with no silicon sealing and for the configurations where there were faults in the silicon sealing. The laboratory study revealed that the joint below the door sill is vulnerable to small mistakes in the workmanship. Given a carefully application and control of the silicon sealing it is possible to achieve a high water tightness performance. However, improvements to the sealing detail is needed to further increase the robustness of the detail.

https://surface.syr.edu/ibpc/2018/BE2/5

 

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