Conference Editor

Jianshun Zhang; Edward Bogucz; Cliff Davidson; Elizabeth Krietemeyer

Location

Syracuse, NY

Event Website

http://ibpc2018.org/

Start Date

24-9-2018 10:30 AM

End Date

24-9-2018 12:00 PM

Description

Water that enters the drainage cavity of a rain screen wall assembly through deficiencies in the cladding will either be drained or retained by absorption or adhesion on the drainage surfaces. The objective of this study is to gain insight into the different factors that affect the quantity of water drained or retained in a drainage cavity. Drainage tests have been conducted for water flowing between two vertical polycarbonate plates with different gap widths to determine the effect on the drainage rate. Tests showed that even small cavities with a width of 1 mm can already drain more water than the amount that would enter the cavity during a rain event. Experiments were performed to determine the contact angle of water on a range of different sheathing materials such as asphalt saturated building paper, spun-bonded polyethylene wrap and cross-woven polyolefin wrap by the use of an optical goniometer. Drainage tests have been conducted for different combinations of these materials to quantify the effect of surface energy on the drainage rate. A larger contact angle results in a smaller quantity of water retained during the drainage test. These tests result in a retained portion of water and a drainage rate for different combinations of materials. The retained portion of water may be considered as a moisture load applied to the outer-most layer of the wall assembly’s back-up wall in hygrothermal simulations.

Comments

If you are experiencing accessibility issues with this item, please contact the Accessibility and Inclusion Librarian through lib-accessibility@syr.edu with your name, SU NetID, the SURFACE link, title of record, and author & and reason for request.

DOI

https://doi.org/10.14305/ibpc.2018.be-2.04

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 4.0 License.

COinS
 
Sep 24th, 10:30 AM Sep 24th, 12:00 PM

Drainage and retention of water in small drainage cavities: Experimental assessment

Syracuse, NY

Water that enters the drainage cavity of a rain screen wall assembly through deficiencies in the cladding will either be drained or retained by absorption or adhesion on the drainage surfaces. The objective of this study is to gain insight into the different factors that affect the quantity of water drained or retained in a drainage cavity. Drainage tests have been conducted for water flowing between two vertical polycarbonate plates with different gap widths to determine the effect on the drainage rate. Tests showed that even small cavities with a width of 1 mm can already drain more water than the amount that would enter the cavity during a rain event. Experiments were performed to determine the contact angle of water on a range of different sheathing materials such as asphalt saturated building paper, spun-bonded polyethylene wrap and cross-woven polyolefin wrap by the use of an optical goniometer. Drainage tests have been conducted for different combinations of these materials to quantify the effect of surface energy on the drainage rate. A larger contact angle results in a smaller quantity of water retained during the drainage test. These tests result in a retained portion of water and a drainage rate for different combinations of materials. The retained portion of water may be considered as a moisture load applied to the outer-most layer of the wall assembly’s back-up wall in hygrothermal simulations.

https://surface.syr.edu/ibpc/2018/BE2/4

 

To view the content in your browser, please download Adobe Reader or, alternately,
you may Download the file to your hard drive.

NOTE: The latest versions of Adobe Reader do not support viewing PDF files within Firefox on Mac OS and if you are using a modern (Intel) Mac, there is no official plugin for viewing PDF files within the browser window.