Title

Falling Ground: Underground Osmosis

Document Type

Thesis, Senior

Degree

B. ARCH

Date

Spring 2019

Keywords

underground, Tokyo, urban, Shinjuku Central Park, architecture, infrastructure

Language

English

Disciplines

Architecture

Description/Abstract

Highly urbanized areas over the world must prepare for another huge population inflow. According to the UN, around 70 percent of the world population will likely live in urban areas by 2050. Big cities such as New York City, Tokyo, and London already face land scarcity and high property costs in their main urban regions.

This thesis explores a new underground typology, adapting into existing urban contexts as a potential solution for these growing issues. Existing infrastructure elements such as parks, subways, and water tanks or sewage systems, which are omnipresent in urban regions, become part of the underground space by merging their forms into a new subterranean architectural language. These infrastructures will help create a wider and denser underground network, not only to connect one place to another but also to create a whole underground landscape that juxtaposes with the architecture above ground. By applying an osmosis effect as a strategy, this underground utilization of space will balance and connect ground to underground and underground to underground.

Additional Information

Thesis Advisors:

Gregory Corso

Source

Local Input

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-Share Alike 4.0 International License.

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