Title

Analytical models for flow control in subsonic and supersonic diffusing flow paths using steady blowing and suction

Date of Award

2008

Degree Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Department

Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

Keywords

Flow control, Diffusing flow, Blowing, Suction, Supersonic flows

Subject Categories

Engineering | Mechanical Engineering

Abstract

Flow blowing/suction has multiple beneficial effects on the performance of axial flow compressors. In both low speed and high speed compressors a small amount of flow blowing and/or suction can be applied in the region of adverse pressure gradient to control the boundary layer separation and obtain high pressure ratio across the compressor. On the other hand in high speed compressors where a passage shock is present inside the passage, flow blowing/suction can also be used to manage the shock location inside the passage and increase the operating range of the compressor.

In the first part of this study, an analytical model based on the integral method for boundary layer with flow blowing in incompressible flows is developed that shows the effect of mass, momentum, velocity magnitude and injection angle of the blowing flow on the behavior of the boundary layer. According to the model the change in the boundary layer momentum thickness across the blowing location is linear function of the momentum of the blowing flow and exponential function of the velocity of the blowing flow. Also if the size of the blowing slot and the velocity of the blown flow are kept constant, when the amount of the blown flow is increased by increasing the blowing angle, there is an "optimum" angle that maximizes the decrease in the momentum thickness across the blowing station. This angle is a function of the velocity ratio and it reaches an asymptotic value of around 40°. The model also shows that the change in the trailing-edge momentum thickness is an exponential function of the change in the momentum thickness across the blowing location. The developed modeled is confirmed for the NACA-65-410 low speed cascade using Computational Fluid Dynamics and a good agreement between the theory and CFD is obtained.

In the second part of the thesis a quasi-1D inviscid and compressible flow theory in a converging/diverging flow passage is presented that can predict the amount of flow blowing or suction at a given location that is required to hold the shock at a given area ratio as the back pressure is varied. The formulation is based on classical inviscid- and compressible-flow theories for normal shock waves and flow transpiration in converging/diverging flow passages. The theory shows that, for the case where there is a shock wave inside a diverging section with supersonic inlet, as the back pressure is increased, the shock can be held stationary if either flow suction is applied behind the shock or flow blowing is applied in front of the shock. For the case of blowing, the amount of flow blowing required to fix the shock location decreases with both increasing total pressure and total temperature of the blown flow. Applications of this quasi-1D theory are demonstrated for 2D supersonic nozzles and supersonic sections of NASA Rotor-37 and NASA UEET R2 rotors taken at the span station 10% from tip. Excellent agreement between the theory and CFD is observed. For the NASA Rotor-37 and NASA UEET R2 rotor cascade sections studied, if suction behind the shock is applied to fix the shock location inside the passage as the back pressure is increased 3-4% from the design point back pressure, the amount of required flow removal is on the order of 3.5% of the main flow. For the same case if flow blowing is applied in front of the shock, the amount of the flow that is needed to be blown to fix the shock location is a function of the stagnation conditions of the blown flow. When the total pressure of the blown flow is taken to be 1.5 times that of the local flow and the total temperature to be 1.3 times that of the local flow the amount of the flow needed to be blown is on the order of 1% of the main flow.

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