Authors/Contributors

Thomas Zoli, Syracuse University

Document Type

Thesis, Senior

Publication Date

5-1997

Keywords

Amsterdam, postindustrial

Language

English

Disciplines

Architecture | Urban, Community and Regional Planning

Description/Abstract

Even with little remaining industrial presence in Amsterdam, NY the relics of industrial prosperity still hold an important urban identity. They represent the city as it was originally designed. I propose that by reprogramming a large section of integrated, industrial urban fabric, it is possible for the city to reclaim its identity and grow. Most early American industrial architecture is inherently urban. only later when planning boards purged industry from the city center because of the side effects if an industrial core, did the evolution on the industrial satellite city emerge. The mill (grist, textile, powder, etc.) was the urban generator for many a small town in the northeastern states. This is the case in Amsterdam, NY. Originally called Veeder's Mills, Amsterdam only gained in population after the industrial infrastructure had been built. The mills came first, and logically so followed urbanity.

Additional Information

Advised by Christopher Gray, Francisco Sanin

Source

Submission

Creative Commons License


This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

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