Authors/Contributors

Nhan Bui

Document Type

Thesis

Publication Date

Spring 5-2016

Degree

B. ARCH

Keywords

architecture, hactivism, politics, activism, critique, infospace

Language

English

Disciplines

Architectural Technology | Cultural Resource Management and Policy Analysis | Other Architecture

Description/Abstract

It is projected that the boundary between our physical and virtual environments will be further blurred through the emergence of the "internet of things" (IoT). The IoT is a network of physical objects embedded with electronics, software, sensors, and network connectivity that enables its objects to collect and exchange information on the internet. The most prevalent example of IoT today is your mobile phone. The mobile phone is an electronic device with software that tracks your location via GPS and your preferences based on your interactions on the internet. The collecting and exchanging of information in today' centralized internet infrastructure is controlled by a few powerful political and corporate institutions, who have influence and ownership over physical infrastructure of the internet (its fiber optic cables, submarine cable stations,data centers, etc.) and over how one navigates it.

This thesis builds upon the "hacktivist" mentality of information accessibility. "Hacktivism" is fundamentally rooted in the belief that information should be free and accessible to everyone. Thus, this thesis looks closely at the politically contested and censored environment of Vietnam through the introduction of hacker space, a hub for technological innovation in Hanoi, as a seed intended to transform the physical and virtual landscape of Vietnam.

Source

local input

Creative Commons License


This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

Share

COinS