Authors/Contributors

Josh Bransky

Document Type

Thesis

Publication Date

Spring 5-2016

Degree

B. ARCH

Keywords

architecture, part to whole, high rise, society, relationships, identity, community, single family, housing

Language

English

Disciplines

Cultural Resource Management and Policy Analysis | Historic Preservation and Conservation | Other Architecture | Urban, Community and Regional Planning

Description/Abstract

Architecture has the power to structure societal relationships. Specifically, architecture's form can bring the balanced relationship between community and individual identity, as exhibited in vernacular single-family homes, to the housing tower. This thesis plans to achieve such a social orchestration through a nuanced understanding of formal part-to-whole relationships, or "differentiated" parts within the whole, exhibited in a 300' housing tower in Seattle, WA.

By carefully balancing the relation, material, scale, and form of each part, this project will achieve this difficult whole (of differentiated parts). Mining this middle ground will produce a housing tower in Seattle, which actively balances the identities of both its larger community and its distinct individuals, confirming the social potential of architecture's form making strategies.

Source

local input

Creative Commons License


This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.