Title

s/h{i+p-s

Authors/Contributors

J. Conrad Hu

Document Type

Thesis, Senior

Publication Date

Spring 2014

Degree

B. ARCH

Keywords

Ships, Recycling, Hu

Language

English

Disciplines

Architecture

Description/Abstract

Ships (specifically interested in cruise ships, cargo ships, tankers and carriers) are constantly being built around the world but at the same time, thousands of ships are recycled, transformed, destroyed, or abandoned. Annually, around 1,000 large endof- life ships are dismantled on tidal beaches causing environmental issues. These vessels simply become objects or artifacts left without purpose or function. Just this year there has been an increase of 9.5% of cargo ships being built and ordered. The Cruise ships have shown even greater growth due to the cruising industry, 167 new ships have been built since 2000. The National Defence Reserve Fleet in Suisan Bay, California, has around 230 decommissioned ships as of 2007. The incline in shipbuilding has been driven by larger capacity, more efficient and advanced ships. With all these ships to come, one has to question, what will happen to the older ships? Will there be an excesses amount of ships in the world? Where do they accumulate? How are they dealt with or recycled? How can these ships be understood through another lens? What are their characteristics? How can these vessels be understood as objects and be reutilized as a new typology? Fig. 2 Suisun Bay - ship graveyard Fig. 3

Additional Information

Thesis Advisers: Jonathan Louie, Edward Sichta

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This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

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