Authors/Contributors

Barbara Burke, Syracuse University

Document Type

Thesis, Senior

Publication Date

Spring 2013

Degree

B. ARCH

Keywords

infrastructure, architecture, religion, mall, worship

Language

English

Disciplines

Architecture

Description/Abstract

I propose that there is a symbiotic way of addressing the aforementioned issues. Using the architecture of a discontinued shopping mall to agglomerate religious houses of worship will establish the opportunity or an environment that promotes religious pluralism, while repurposing infrastructural scar tissue. While seemingly disparate, the mall and the house of worship afford similar opportunities. First, they bring together like-minded people, fostering a sense of community. Second, they are both quasi-public facilities (privately-owned but publicly accessible). They are targeted to a specific demographic and require behavioral conduct. Both are designed to promote an atmosphere conducive to their activity, and both involve repetitive ritual. When viewed through this lens, the shopping mall and the house of worship perform similarly as community hubs for gathering and exchange.

Additional Information

Advisors: Larry Bowne / Sinead MacNamara

Source

student submission

Creative Commons License


This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

Included in

Architecture Commons

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